One answer is found in 1 Timothy 4:3-5: “[Some] forbid marriage and advocate abstaining from foods which God has created to be gratefully shared in by those who believe and know the truth. For everything created by God is good, and nothing is to be rejected if it is received with gratitude; for it is sanctified by means of the word of God and prayer.”

Orange juice was “created to be received with thanksgiving by those who believe the truth.” Therefore, unbelievers cannot use orange juice for the purpose God intended—namely, as an occasion for heartfelt gratitude to God from a truth heart of faith.

But believers can, and this is how they glorify God. Their drinking orange juice is “sanctified by means of the word of God and prayer.” The word of God teaches us that the juice, and even our strength to drink it, is a free gift of God (1 Corinthians 4:7; 1 Peter 4:11).

The prayer is our humble response of thanks from the heart. Believing this truth in the word, and offering thanks in prayer is one way we drink orange juice to the glory of God.

The other way is to drink lovingly. For example, don’t insist on the biggest helping. This is taught in the context of 1 Corinthians 10:33, “I try to please all men in everything I do, not seeking my own advantage, but that of many, that they may be saved” (RSV). “Be imitators of me, just as I also am of Christ” (1 Corinthians 11:1). Everything we do—even drinking orange juice—can be done with the intention and hope that it will be to the advantage of many that they may be saved. — John Piper

In today’s church, there are two types of people — publicly legalistic people who are privately licentious and publicly ascetic folks who are privately hedonistic. The word to both groups is the same: “Let no one seek his own good, but the good of his neighbor.” The legalists sought their own good and ignored the way their approach bound the conscience of their neighbors. The licentious one sought their own good and ignored the way their approach scandalized the conscience of their neighbors. The word to both is, “Stop seeking your own good. Seek the good of your neighbor, thereby giving glory to God. — Stephen Um

God Glorifying Neighborly Principle #1: Don’t Bind Your Neighbor’s Conscience If God Hasn’t Declared It Off Limits

4 Therefore, as to the eating of food offered to idols, we know that “an idol has no real existence,” and that “there is no God but one.” 5 For although there may be so-called gods in heaven or on earth—as indeed there are many “gods” and many “lords”— 6 yet for us there is one God, the Father, from whom are all things and for whom we exist, and one Lord, Jesus Christ, through whom are all things and through whom we exist.

8 Food will not commend us to God. We are no worse off if we do not eat, and no better off if we do.

God Glorifying Neighborly Principle #2: Serve Others With Your Every Day Choices

To Paul, this was true Christian freedom: to do whatever it takes to love one’s neighbor for the sake of Jesus. — Jon Bloom

Be Winsome

Be Strategic

Whatever you do, do it WELL for the glory of God, and do it somewhere strategic for the mission of God. — JD Greer

Be Worshipful

Chris Daukas

Chris grew up in a moral home, but didn’t find the grace of Christ until he was a sophomore in college. He began to devour the Word and was soon helping to lead bible studies, outreaches, and worship at church. He married his beautiful wife, Tara, in the summer of 2002.

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